Can You Visit Schengen Countries On A Type-D Schengen Visa?

Can You Visit Schengen Countries On A Type-D Schengen Visa

Among the different types of Schengen visas, the Type-D visa permits longer stays for specific purposes, such as study, work, or family reunification. However, many people are unsure whether they can visit Schengen Countries On A Type-D Schengen Visa. 

In this article, we will explore whether it is possible to visit Schengen countries on a Type-D visa and what requirements are necessary for non-work-related travel. 

We will also provide essential information to help you understand the Schengen visa policy and plan your trip to Europe.

Can You Visit Schengen Countries On A Type-D Schengen Visa?

Yes, a Type-D Schengen visa is a long-stay visa, which allows its holder to travel within the Schengen area outside of the country they initially applied in. It allows you to stay in any other Schengen country for up to 90 days over a period of 180 days.  

The main purpose for applying for a Type-D Schengen visa is either for tourism or private visits. 

It can also be used if you wish to conduct research on work-related matters, as well as attend conferences and seminars. However, business trips cannot be undertaken with this kind of visa. 

If you decide to apply for a Type-DSchengen visa, you must also provide proof that you have enough money to support yourself during your stay and the means to return home. 

Additionally, if you plan on staying in any of the Schengen countries for a long period of time, you will need to obtain a residence permit from that particular country. 

It is important to note that while a Type-D Schengen visa offers numerous advantages, it does not grant holders an automatic right of entry into any of the Schengen countries or provide them with a guarantee for their stay duration. 

All decisions regarding visa applications and entries are still made by border control officers at the point of entry. 

Which Non-Schengen Countries Allow Entry For Type-D Schengen Visa Holders?

Which Non-Schengen Countries Allow Entry For Type-D Schengen Visa Holders?
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Having a valid Schengen visa grants access to several other countries which are not part of the European Union or the Schengen area. These include: 

  • Albania 
  • Andorra 
  • Armenia 
  • Azerbaijan 
  • Belarus 
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina 
  • Georgia  
  • Kosovo  
  • Macedonia (FYROM)  
  • Moldova  
  • Montenegro
  • Russia 
  • Serbia 
  • Ukraine 
  • Turkey (except Istanbul) 

It’s important to note that these countries don’t offer visa-free entry. Thus, you must apply for a special permit or visa depending on the country. 

The purpose of your visit will also determine what type of visa you need. 

For example, if you’re traveling for business purposes, you’ll need a business visa. On the other hand, if it’s for tourism, you’ll require a relevant tourist visa. 

You must meet all eligibility requirements and ensure that your documents are in order before applying for any visas or permits. 

What Is The Type D Long-Stay Schengen Visa?

A type D long-stay Schengen visa is mandatory for any foreigner wishing to study, work or live in a Schengen country for longer than 90 days (up to 1 year). It allows its holder to travel and stay in the Schengen area outside of the originally chosen Schengen country.

With a Type D Long Stay Visa, you can stay for a period of 90 days maximum of over 180 days, and during the entire validity period of your visa.

The purposes which can be used as justification when applying for a category D visa include tourism or private visits and professional activities. They may also include studying, taking part in a training program, completing an internship, and family reasons.

It’s important to note that the type-D long-stay Schengen visa is different from a short-stay Schengen visa. The latter enables a foreigner to stay in the Schengen area for up to 90 days within 180 days. 

So make sure you apply for the right visa depending on your travel purpose and duration of stay. 

Overview Of Countries Open For Visit Using Type-D Schengen Visa

Here is a table naming different countries you can visit using your Type-D Schengen Visa

Country Can you visit for tourism with a Type-D Schengen Visa?
Austria Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Belgium Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Czech Republic Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Denmark Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Estonia No
Finland Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
France Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Germany Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Greece Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Hungary No
Iceland Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Italy Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Latvia No
Liechtenstein Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Lithuania No
Luxembourg Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Malta Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Netherlands Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Norway Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Poland No
Portugal Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Slovakia Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Slovenia Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Spain Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Sweden Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions
Switzerland Yes, for a limited period of time and under certain conditions

What Are The Different Types Of Uniform Schengen Visas?

The Uniform Schengen Visa is a visa that allows its holder to move freely within the 26 European countries belonging to the Schengen Area. It is divided into two categories, “A” and “C”. Both the categories of Uniform Schengen Visas are explained in detail below.

Category “A” stands for the Airport Transit Visa which enables travelers to transit through the international zone of a Schengen country airport without entering the Schengen Area

This type of visa is necessary for those traveling from one non-Schengen state to another non-Schengen state, with a change of flights in a Schengen country airport. 

Category “C” stands for Short-term visas which allow its holders to enter and stay in the Schengen Area for a certain period of time, ranging from 3 to 6 months. 

This type of visa is often used as a business visa or tourist visa. Depending on the purpose and duration of your trip, you may need an appropriate Short-term Visa C. 

It is important to note that all categories of the Uniform Schengen Visa are subject to conditions and restrictions which vary according to each country’s particular regulations. 

Therefore, it is always best to check the official website of each country before applying for a Schengen Visa. 

What Are The Different Types Of Multiple Entry Visas?

What Are The Different Types Of Multiple Entry Visas?
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For those looking to make multiple trips to Europe within a certain time period, multiple-entry Schengen Visas may be the solution. These visas come in three varieties — one-year, three-year, and five-year — each designed to meet travelers’ needs. One-year Multiple-Entry Schengen Visas are the most commonly issued type of multiple-entry visa. 

They can be obtained by those who have used three visas within the previous two years and adhere to the 90/180 days rule. This means that travelers must not stay in Europe for more than 90 days out of any 180-day period.

Three-year Multiple-Entry Schengen Visas are similar to one-year ones but with a longer validity period.

In order to qualify, applicants must have lawfully used a previous multiple-entry visa valid for one year within the past two years. As with one-year visas, they also must not exceed 90 days within any given 180-day period.

Five-year Multiple-Entry Schengen Visas offer an even longer period of validity and require more stringent qualifications. 

Those seeking this type of visa must have used a previous multiple-entry visa valid for at least two years over the past three years and, again, should adhere to the 90/180 days rule. 

As is true for all other Schengen Visas, having a good travel history, financial stability and sufficient proof of accommodation are also important factors in securing a five-year multiple-entry visa.

What Is A Single Entry Schengen Visa?

A single-entry Schengen visa permits you to travel from a country outside the Schengen area to the Netherlands or other Schengen countries but only enter once. It is required for anyone who wishes to visit any of the 26 European countries in the Schengen Zone.

The duration of your stay must be within 90 days per 180-day period and it cannot be extended beyond this limit

Upon entering one of these countries you will receive a stamp in your passport that will state the date of entry and the duration of your stay. 

It is important to note that in order to obtain a single-entry Schengen visa, you must provide valid identification documents. These include proof of your financial means and travel insurance that covers medical expenses. 

The cost of obtaining a single-entry Schengen visa varies depending on which country you are applying from.

However, it is typically around €60 or $70 USD. 

The processing time for these visas can take up to two weeks. Thus, make sure to apply at least three weeks before your departure date. 

Which Countries Are Part Of The Schengen Area?

The Schengen area is a unified zone of 26 countries that have abolished passports and any other type of border control at their common borders. This means that citizens of all member countries are free to move and travel within the area without restrictions. 

Schengen States include Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden, and Switzerland. 

All these countries apply a common visa policy for short-stay visas

Traveling from one country to another within the Schengen Area requires no more than an identity card or passport. 

The absence of travel restrictions makes it easier for business people, tourists and others to move within the area. 

With no border checks, traveling between countries in the Schengen zone is essentially like traveling within a single country. 

The Schengen Area provides freedom of movement to its citizens while providing enhanced security throughout the region. 

By making travel easier and safer, it has helped boost tourism and the economy in many European countries.  

The success of the Schengen Agreement has inspired similar open-border initiatives elsewhere in Europe and beyond. 

What Is Schengen Visa 90/180 Rule?

The Schengen visa 90/180 rule is the most important concept to understand when applying for a Schengen Visa. It states that you may only spend up to 90 days within any 180-day period in the Schengen Area, regardless of where you enter and leave the Zone. 

This means that if you travel to France for two weeks, then Italy for one week, and then Germany for three weeks, your total time spent within the Schengen Area would already be four weeks, and thus over your allotted 90-day limit

It’s also important to note that each day spent outside of the Schengen Area counts as “one day” towards the 90/180 rule, meaning that even if you leave the Schengen Area for a day on a day trip, it will still count against your 90 days. 

It’s also important to note that if you overstay your Schengen Visa, you could face serious consequences. 

Depending on where you overstayed and how long, you could be deported or banned from entering the Schengen Area again in the future. 

Therefore, it’s important to pay close attention to the 90/180 rule and make sure that you do not exceed your allotted time within the Zone.

Who Does The 90/180 Rule Apply To?

The 90/180-day rule is applicable to non-EU citizens who can enter the Schengen area without a visa and those with a multiple-entry Schengen visa that is valid for more than 90 days. This includes nationals of countries that require ETIAS authorization in order to travel to the Schengen states.

Essentially, this means any individual from outside of the European Union, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, or Liechtenstein who wishes to stay for longer than 90 days within a 180-day period must comply with the 90/180-day rule if they wish to travel legally. 

Depending on their nationality, they may also need an ETIAS visa waiver before entering. 

The 90/180-day rule is an important part of the EU’s Schengen regulations and must be adhered to in order to travel legally within the Schengen area. 

It is important to note that any days spent outside of the Schengen zone, such as traveling to a non-Schengen country, will not count towards the 180-day period. 

Can You Enter The Schengen Area More Than One Time During That Period?

Can You Enter The Schengen Area More Than One Time During That Period?
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Yes, you can enter the Schengen area more than one time during the specified period. However, in order to do so, you must carefully calculate your days of stay and make sure that they don’t exceed the overall total of 90 (ninety) days within any 180-day

In other words, if you have already spent a certain number of days in the Schengen area during a 180-day period before your latest arrival, then you will only be allowed to stay for as many additional days as necessary for your total visit.

This should not exceed 90 (ninety) days within that same period. 

It is important to note that this rule applies regardless of how many times and which countries you visited during those 180 days. 

Therefore, you must account for the total number of days spent in the Schengen area during that specific period and any further visits should not add up to more than 90 (ninety) days. 

If the overall duration of your stay exceeds the limit, then you risk legal sanctions.  

Make sure to always be well-informed when visiting a Schengen country and adhere to all regulations concerning entry and stay!  

Conclusion

In conclusion, while a Type-D visa allows for longer stays in a Schengen country for specific reasons such as study, work, or family reunification, it is not a substitute for a standard Schengen tourist visa.

Therefore, if you intend to visit a Schengen country for tourism, you must obtain a Schengen tourist visa, which has specific requirements and limitations. 

It is also important to note that the Schengen visa policy is subject to change.

It is essential to check with the relevant embassy or consulate before applying for a visa.

Swati Jaiswal

Swati Jaiswal is a dedicated traveler and an even dedicated individual who specializes in travel, digital marketing, & health and fitness niches. Passport stamps and coffee stains are her badges of honor.

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